Fat Girl Walking: Book Review and Interview

Fat Girl Walking: Book Review and Interview

Arts & Culture, Books, Uncategorized
By Laurie Fundukian   Brittany Gibbons is a woman who speaks her mind, and her mind is hilarious. She has decided to make people uncomfortable and change the societal mandate that fat women need to be hidden and put in their place. Agree with her or not, there is no denying that she is a terrific writer with a unique voice. She has built a career, relationship, and family, all while being fat, which I think she would like to not be her first identifier some day, but knows that day has not arrived just yet--but she's workin' on it. I had the pleasure of speaking with her about her book and life, and she is very funny, down to earth, and smart. When I asked her who her heroes…
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Book Review: Station Eleven

Book Review: Station Eleven

Arts & Culture, Books
  Book Review: Station Eleven Laurie Fundukian Emily St. John Mandel’s fourth novel, Station Eleven, begins with the ending of one person, and an ending of sorts for a whole society—an imaginary scenario, but not completely outside of the realm of possibility in the real world. The book is a tale of a post-apocalyptic world that manages to weave in Shakespeare into the plot—a major bonus. Onstage one night in a Toronto theater, while performing the title role in King Lear, 51-year-old Arthur Leander has a fatal heart attack. While this event is a shock to the theater world, a bigger shock is coming in the form of a major pandemic, the Georgia Flu, which has arrived via airplane from Eastern Europe and decimates Toronto (and the world) in days.…
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PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

Arts & Culture, Life & Community, Stories
By Diana Creel Elarde I cross the campus in the silence of the early morning. Even if the cars on the avenues around here tried to make noise, their tires remain quiet as they roll over the fresh layers of snow. The silence has caught my attention. In a city of cars, buses and light rail, there always seems to be the air of noise. Usually their noises float past my thoughts; they integrate themselves into my mind, a constant background to my city day. Today the silence of it all captures my direct attention, making each step I take sound gigantic in nature. Perhaps they are gigantic. I never dreamed I would be on a campus, at least not officially as a student. Yet here I am; a world…
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Book Review: The Girl on the Train

Book Review: The Girl on the Train

Arts & Culture, Books
Paula Hawkins has caused some buzz so far this year with her thriller/mystery The Girl on the Train, which is being touted as the British Gone Girl. The comparisons to Gone Girl are apt, mostly because of the use of three narrators (though GG only had two), all of whom present as unreliable witnesses to the story, which is always an interesting construction. The reader only gets the male perspective through the female lens, however, which is where this book differs from Gone Girl, and carves out its own path. But yes, a girl does get “gone” in this story as well, and there is some suspense for the reader to shiver about. The main female character is Rachel, a young women who will make readers’ lives seem charmed in…
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Abba Father

Abba Father

Arts & Culture
By Martti C. Peeples I lay still in the silence, allowing my mind to reminisce. My mind wondering back to a time of which I have only read or saw a visual. Yet my heart and soul feel the cries of a people longing to be free, arms outstretched to the Heavens, crying out, “ABBA FATHER.” They toil in the dirt daily, they remain in a vocal silence, but in song or eye contact, they speak amongst themselves, “Freedom be a-coming, freedom be a-coming.” At night they lay beneath the stars caressing one another, capturing a moment, for tomorrow may not be promised; but still they whisper to one another, “Freedom be a-coming, freedom be a-coming.” Morning comes with a sound of a trumpet playing; the sound isn’t music, but…
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Movies and Festivals in Detroit and Michigan

Movies and Festivals in Detroit and Michigan

Arts & Culture
  When this issue makes it to print, the Academy Awards will have aired and that Hollywood excitement will rest until next year. But Hollywood isn’t the only entity (and, arguably, not necessarily the best) for film appreciation. The Detroit area and other spots in Michigan are presenting some worthwhile film events in March and beyond. The second annual Freep Film Fest, founded by the Detroit Free Press and Michigan.com, runs March 19-22. It showcases documentary “films that are about or relevant to Detroit, the region and Michigan in the hopes of fostering engagement and discussion about the issues and challenges we face while at the same time celebrating what makes us unique.” The event’s venue partners are the Fillmore Detroit and the Detroit Film Theatre at the Detroit Institute…
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