The Chaperone

The Chaperone

Arts & Culture, Books, Uncategorized
A Book Review by Laurie Fundukian Laura Moriarty, who teaches creative writing at the University of Kansas, has written three other novels, but The Chaperone garnered the most critical and fan attention. It was published in 2012 and became a best-seller, but it wasn’t on my radar until my book club selected it this summer. Better late than never! The Chaperone follows the trend of books such as The Paris Wife, Loving Frank, and Z, which give a fictionalized narrative about real people (Hemingway’s first wife, Frank Lloyd-Wright’s mistress, and Zelda Fitzgerald, respectively). The Chaperone looks at the real-life characters of Louise Brooks, who was a silent film star in the 20s, and Cora Carlisle, and focuses mostly on Cora (a “matron” at age 36!), who has the privilege of…
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Give me Literacy!

Give me Literacy!

Life & Community
  Where is our modern day Patrick Henry? Where is our advocate for upward linguistic mobility that recognizes the liberty in literacy? It is true that if you want to lead, you must read! The saying goes, if you want to hide something from a black person, put it in a book.  I remember being told this in school and experiencing an unsettling feeling in my heart, when I heard such a message. In my six years as a teacher, I have witnessed the continued decline and lack of interest towards reading books by our young black men. Many of our youth in Detroit are dressed in the finest apparel, yet facing educational peril. A report from Education Week, a weekly educational newspaper, reports that Detroit’s high school dropout rate…
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Lack of Values at Heart of Illiteracy Problem

Events, Life & Community
At the age of 13, Yusef  Shakoor was  part of a gang.  At 15, his mother made him a ward of the state and at age 19, he was imprisoned for a crime he says he didn’t commit. The son of a single parent with limited support, Shakoor never imagined pursuing higher education. When confronted with the opportunity to go to college, Shakoor said the idea scared him so much he wanted to kill himself. It was a book given to him when he met his father in prison that changed his life. Shakoor is now an author and owner of Urban Network Bookstore and CEO of Urban Gorilla Entertainment. He was one of seven educated and well-established African American men discussing illiteracy and its impact on society during a…
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